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Black People Don’t Have to Inherit Their Ableism

I absolutely love this blog post.

Crutches & Spice

Let me make myself clear, this post is not an opportunity for majority culture to attack black people, not even a little bit. With that in mind, I have noticed over the past few years a disturbing trend among people of otherwise marginalized groups. Specifically, mine. Ableism is rampant in the black community. Despite being the community most prone to becoming disabled as they age from a combination of a healthcare system that ignores our complaints until they’ve become more serious and over-policing that results in brutality, the worst thing some black people can think of is the prospect of becoming disabled.

Like black people have to do with White Feminists, disabled black people have to beg to be seen in contexts and initiatives that claim to be “intersectional” or “represent blackness.” So how did we get here? Well? You guessed it—White Supremacy, and our own inherited culture. Theoretically, prior…

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10 Commandments of Disability Etiquette

This is important !

wearealsohuman

Below are some general rules of association which I would like you to observe every time you associate with people with disabilities.

  1. When talking with a person with a disability, speak directly to that person rather than through a companion or sign language interpreter.
  2. When introduced to a person with a disability, it is appropriate to offer to shake hands. People with limited hand use or who wear an artificial limb can usually shake hands. (Shaking hands with the left hand is an acceptable greeting.)
  3. When meeting a person who is visually impaired, always identify yourself and others who may be with you. When conversing in a group, remember to identify the person to whom you are speaking.
  4. If you offer assistance, wait until the offer is accepted. Then listen to or ask for instructions.
  5. Treat adults as adults. Address people who have disabilities by their first names only when…

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